Refining Details

This cardigan is the second sweater that I’ve bordered my signature rib with a  vikkel braid stitch.  I only say ‘signature rib’ not because I had anything to do with inventing,  but it is a hybrid rib & moss stitch edging I made up for myself  after some experimentation, and which I love so much that I don’t see any end to using.  In particular,  the bound-off edge I use matches it perfectly, or mirrors the vikkel, making the rib nicely bordered by a braid on both sides.  With the addition of the vikkel braid stitch, I feel my edging style is symmetric, pleasing , and finished.


The vikkel works so well as a transition between the ‘body’ and the ‘edge’ because it seems to cover up a sometimes awkward and messy decrease row transitioning into the rib band that seamless yoke sweaters tend to have. Next time I may try two rows of vikkel braid stitch. Or three !

The finish of the two short seems at the join of the body and arms, has become a matter of finer finishings for me. I always do a rough job of sewing seams from raw bound-off edges, but I do love the grafting idea, so I just transfer the stitches onto two short needles (or scrap yarn, or stitch holder) instead of binding off, so they’re all ready to graft together with no hassle. In fact, I think next time I will graft first thing so I’m not having to knit the whole yoke with the hardware hanging out of the armpits. Get it over and done with!

Each time I do this grafting thing to bring the tiny seam together at the ‘arm pit’, I get better ( that is in theory, unless there’s a bit of a time lapse between the last, which in this case, may have been too long).

Practice makes perfect and I’m observing that once the stitches are taken off the needle and grafted together, that trying to take them apart to do over is courting disaster. So, rather than doing the grafting over, I’ll just leave it looking messy and smoosh out the bulky grafted seams when I wash and block.

In the Home Stretch.

Okay, so I totally blew my deadline of having these finished last week. But they will be finished this weekend , you can count on it, then they’re off to Northern Ireland !


I am learning *so* much about so many things with this unexpectedly epic little project : a braided cable, cuffing and reversing direction of knitting, narrowing down into a garter section (I chose to use smaller needles as well), Eye-of-Partridge stitch, sock gussets, and soon to be toe shaping and kitchener stitch… and I’m reinforcing my skill in reading a pattern (something I haven’t done much of, strangely). I had to totally improvise picking up stitches, and I got my SSK and K2tog mixed up a few rows on the first sock gusset start (quite obvious if you look closely at the one on the left). So far these have been a hugely valuable learning experience. I will miss them when they are done.

Heel Flap & Turn !


My first , very first HEEL FLAP & HEEL TURN ! Spent the good part of a day at my girlfriend Morrie’s house yesterday as we knit, drank yerbe matte, and laughed a lot (we watched some silly YouTube vids of hillarious Scottish comedy, apropo for a spell of turning a heel on Kilt Hose.) By her generous and patient nature, I managed to learn a new stitch pattern used for this particular Kilt Hose, called “Eye of Partridge” stitch, and shaped the heel flap, then managed to stay with the pattern as well as possible, through the turn. Thanks Morrie !

Kilt Hose project journey starts here.

Fussing About

I am working on a kind of signature edging. A hybrid sort of rib with ‘moss’ stitch in between the ribs. (I realize there is probably an official name for this exact rib, but for now I’m thinking it up for myself).

In fact, this whole designing concept is quite a new thing for me. I’ve been browsing and reading knitters’ blogs lately, knitting designers’ blogs in particular.  I don’t know, but maybe one day I’d like to see myself among this vast tribe, selling a pdf pattern or two of my own, and I think that I will make that a goal for this year, or next.  I’m one of those people in life who always wilts in the heat of competition, but I ask myself “Why not me too?” ~ and I honestly can’t think of a reason not to. This is good for a change, a big growing up step for me.